CRAZY BEYONCÉ

Bienvenue sur Crazy Beyoncé. Bonne visite !

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Message par KEY9481 le 19/07/11, 03:19 pm

COMPLEX [2011] Beyonce-Complex-Cover_floer

I have an authentic, God-given talent, drive, and longevity that will always separate me from everyone else. I’ve been fortunate to accomplish things that the younger generation of queens dream of accomplishing. I have no desire for anyone else’s throne. I am very comfortable in the throne I’ve been building for the past 15 years.

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Dernière édition par Δ le 19/07/11, 03:26 pm, édité 3 fois
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Message par Invité le 19/07/11, 03:22 pm

Beaucoup (trop) retouché, mais J'ADORE. :shock: :boum*:
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Message par KEY9481 le 19/07/11, 03:28 pm

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Message par KEY9481 le 19/07/11, 03:41 pm

It's hard to believe that it was only eight years ago that Beyoncé released her debut solo album (and appeared on her first Complex cover). Today, she moves like a seasoned vet, blowing her pop peers out of the water with her professionalism and power on stage. With her latest album 4, it seems like B is pushing every aspect of her career in bold new creative directions, which makes her the perfect person to cover our annual Style & Design issue, where we showcase all the cutting edge developments in Complex's world.

For the cover story, we recruited photographer Thierry Le Gouès and artist Ebon Heath, who created the unique typography sculptures that surround B. The August/September issue doesn't officially hit stands until August 9, but we're giving you a chance to check out the full cover story, extended gallery, and behind-the-scenes video now.

Who runs the pop world? Beyoncé. After a year away to spread her wings, Queen Bey is back to reclaim her throne.

Conventional wisdom holds that people should be afraid of turning 30. It’s the dreaded age when the biological clock starts tickin’ with the menace of a time bomb. Thirty is the point at which someone can call a woman “old”—and she will actually believe it. Conventional wisdom says that turning 16, 18, and 21 kicks ass. Turning 30 kicks rocks.

Of course conventional wisdom isn’t all that wise. Thirty ain’t all that bad. (In truth, women tend to be the most well-rounded and sexiest during their 30s. #justsayin) Still, it has a way of focusing people. Beyoncé Giselle Knowles turns 30 in September. She’s acutely aware of time slipping into the future. Her ticking clock, however, has nothing to do with insecure thoughts of feeling old or washed up. Not by a long shot.

No, Beyoncé is in a race against time because of a simple, bluntly put question: Where the f*&k does she go from here? What does thirtysomething feel like if you’ve accomplished everything most people could ever dream of—wealth, fame, artistic accolades, love—in your teens and twenties?

It turns out that, for Beyoncé, the answer to that question is equally simple (and bluntly put). Where does she go? Wherever the f*&k she wants to. Bey has spent the last 15 years paying dues. Now a worldwide icon, she has set her heart and mind to establishing a legacy that she’s determined will be dictated by artistic freedom. She’s not afraid of turning 30. If anything, the world should be afraid of her turning 30.

" Kanye was singing his heart out for five minutes. He is so vulnerable. I love when an artist can be honest. "


In March 2010, Beyoncé came off the world tour for her album, I Am…Sasha Fierce, and did something she hadn’t really done as an adult: She lived a normal life. After years maintaining a grueling work schedule that included exhaustive touring, she took a much-needed vacay. For the next year, she did all sorts of—for her—novel things. She slept in her own bed for days at a time. She went to concerts and movies and museums with friends. She spent time picking through the iTunes of her younger sister, Solange (who has a side gig as a DJ and whom Bey credits as her unofficial A&R), playing with her nephew, and watching documentary footage of Jean-Michel Basquiat painting from scratch.

Of course the whole “vacay” concept is a little different for Beyoncé. (For one, she traveled, too. And suffice it to say that you and I aren’t invited to a lot of the places she visited.) What did you do on your vacation? Well, the hardest working woman in entertainment started a production company and learned how to edit movies. And, in studios across the world, she recorded more than 60 songs, 12 of which appear on her latest album, 4, which was officially released in June. You see, whereas a yearlong hiatus for one of us might involve an inordinate number of hours spent in our pajamas, for Beyoncé, even downtime is work time. “I traveled; I read; I watched films,” she says. “Inspiration is all around us every second of the day.”

The inspiration for 4 came from a variety of sources, with the end result being something that doesn’t sound exactly like any of them. Dissatisfied with the state of contemporary radio, she set about brewing a concoction entirely of her own design, based on influences you’d expect her to cite, as well as ones that might surprise. “Figuring out a way to get R&B back on the radio is challenging,” she explains. “Everything sounds the same on the radio. With 4 I tried to mix R&B from the ’70s and the ’90s with rock ‘n’ roll and a lot of horns to create something new and exciting. I wanted musical changes, bridges, vibrata, live instrumentation, and classic songwriting.”

She started the process by jamming with the band from Fela!, the Broadway musical based on the life of Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti, and recorded tracks everywhere from New York to Australia to Peter Gabriel’s studio in the English countryside city of Bath. And—hewing again to the “no rules” mantra of the process—she worked with collaborators both old (The-Dream, Babyface) and new (Switch, Sleigh Bells). She even chopped it up with Odd Future. “Jay had a CD playing in the car one Sunday when we were driving to Brooklyn,” she recalls of hearing Frank Ocean for the first time. “I noticed his tone, his arrangements, and his storytelling. I immediately reached out to him—literally the next morning. I asked him to fly to New York and work on my record.”

" People who complain really get on my nerves. When I’m not feeling my best I ask, ‘What are you gonna do about it?’ "


Andre 3000 is also on board. He makes an appearance on the Kanye West-produced track “Party.” Although it wasn’t her first time working with ’Ye, Beyoncé was particularly keen to reconvene in the studio with the man who made the moody “Runaway,” a song that drove her to the edge of tears the first time she heard it in a van heading to one of Jay’s shows. ’Ye played it for Bey on his birthday.

“The fact that he’s belting out his pain, his confusion, and his anger, with no pre-written lyrics, was so moving,” she says. “He’s singing his heart out for five minutes. He is so vulnerable. I love when an artist can be so honest.”

Released in April, the lead single, “Run the World (Girls),” swagger-jacked the beat from Major Lazer’s “Pon de Floor,” but it’s Bey’s full-throated vocal styling and her trademark feminist stamp that made the insane and souped-up riddim her own.

“I’ve found that with hit records the melody and lyrics come together [naturally],” she explains. “I usually know from the hook if the song is something that transcends language, race, and genre, and if it’s something that affects pop culture. It’s something I can visualize people singing in stadiums all over the world. But my favorite songs on my albums are usually not my singles.”

The world premiere of the “Run” video was, as expected, an event, presenting a post-Rapture world of sandy destruction and kinetic dancing. Bey channeled a bit of Tina Turner in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome mixed with a dash of Grace Jones in Conan the Destroyer, symbolically demonstrating that her drive to take over the world is still in effect.

Before she takes over the world, though, Beyoncé is taking control of her career. In March, she announced that she would no longer be managed by her father, Mathew Knowles. Both sides took pains to describe the split as amicable, but it was nonetheless a giant step for an artist whose family has played such a vital role in her career. Still, it’s a natural progression, and it’s not as if she doesn’t have other family members to bounce ideas off these days.

“Jay’s music is more than music. His lyrics have fathered generations,” she says of her husband of three years. “All that he has overcome gives millions so much hope. There are moments when I see his lips moving and I can see lyrics floating above his head and I think, ‘Wow! How did I get so lucky to be able to witness this level of genius so closely?’”

Whenever I feel bad, I use that feeling to motivate me to work harder,” says a much wiser, more mature Beyoncé, who learned from some early ordeals, including a period of depression during the first breakup of her first group, Destiny’s Child. “I only allow myself one day to feel sorry for myself. People who complain really get on my nerves. When I’m not feeling my best I ask myself, ‘What are you gonna do about it?’ I use the negativity to fuel the transformation into a better me.”

That same call for inner strength was loudly spelled out in Destiny’s Child’s string of smash hits. Songs like “Independent Woman Part 1,” “Survivor,” and the extra-jelly-is-A-OK anthem “Bootylicious” forever linked DC with the term “female empowerment.” As a solo artist, Beyoncé would continue belting out pro-female calls to arms like “Irreplaceable” and “Best Thing I Never Had,” the second single (co-written by Babyface) from 4. Lines like “You showed your ass and I, I saw the real you” and “Oh yeah, I bet it sucks to be you right now,” have become the sassy method by which Bey can connect with her female listeners (the fellas can't deny the tracks either).

Admittedly, there are times when the female unity is not so unified, like when Beyonce was photographed for the artwork of the “Best Thing” single. She wrote “King B” on a mirror with red lipstick, a nod to womanly control. The problem was that noted video director/tastemaker Vashtie Kola had previously appropriated the royal moniker for herself, and made a sly remark on Twitter about Bey’s use of it.

" I’ve been fortunate to accomplish things that the younger generation of queens dream of accomplishing. I have no desire for anyone else’s throne. "


There have been other confrontational moments—or, at least, perceived conflict. A portion of the public has been convinced for a while now that there’s tension between Beyoncé and her ex-bandmate Kelly Rowland despite the two of them denying reports and appearing together in public as friends. The fact that both released singles on the same day back in ’08 was somehow interpreted to mean that Bey was trying to sabotage Kelly. (This year, the Internet went nuts when Rowland’s latest single, “Motivation,” toppled “Run the World” on iTunes, as if it was some sort of karma.) The gossip queens also insisted there would be a full-scale war between Beyoncé and Lady Gaga even though the two have collaborated twice in the past. The rumors, as it turned out, were just that—rumors.

Then, of course, there is Bey’s “rival” Rihanna. This “feud” at least makes sense to a degree, even if both women have insisted there is no rivalry. The Bajan superstar, who has had a shorter yet stellar career of her own, has repeatedly (and respectfully) stated in interviews that she has always looked up to Beyonce, rightfully so.

Bey, who continually makes Forbes lists and racks up Grammys (her six wins in one night at the 2010 ceremony is a record for a female artist), doesn’t fret too much over the drama—even if you can tell the question irks her, simply in the asking. “There is room on this earth for many queens,” she begins diplomatically, before drawing a few not-at-all subtle lines of distinction. “I have an authentic, God-given talent, drive, and longevity that will always separate me from everyone else. I’ve been fortunate to accomplish things that the younger generation of queens dream of accomplishing. I have no desire for anyone else’s throne. I am very comfortable in the throne I’ve been building for the past 15 years.”

The funny thing is, her effortless comfort in that throne is the thing that separates her from the competition—the Queen is a commoner at heart. She’s chummy with Oprah and sang the first dance for the new generation President and his wife, but she’ll stop and boogie at a block party while visiting her mother-in-law in West Orange, New Jersey (as captured on a YouTube clip last year).

Beyoncé’s not claiming perfection; she’d just like to be afforded the freedom that goes with being what she rightfully is: one of the most accomplished recording artists of the 21st century. She’d like to explain to you what that’s like, but ultimately, she’s the only one who really knows how it feels. “It’s important to have no boundaries in my music,” she muses. “The beautiful thing about art is that you can create a fantasy in your mind about what you think a song is about. Only the writer truly knows what or whom the song is about.”

Talent and drive. Style and design. The former may come naturally, but the latter are products of work, work, and more work: “I just want my legacy to be great music. Someone who was a risk taker and someone who had songs that struck conversation and emotion.” You can be afraid of 30 if you want, but that’s not what’s keeping Beyonce up at night.
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Message par KEY9481 le 19/07/11, 04:35 pm


COMPLEX [2011] BeyonceLead


Meet Ebon Heath. He's a Berlin-based artist with roots in Brooklyn and Bali who has a quite well diversified portfolio. His experience ranges from designing for Triple 5 Soul and Bad Boy Entertainment in the 1990s (Biggie's "Life After Death" LP design? Yeah, that was Heath) to jewelry design, sculpture and now Complex covers.

The text-based pieces you see wrapping Beyoncé on the new cover and the inside spread are actually physical sculptures that Heath created—not 3D text renderings or fancy Photoshop designs. The pieces were hung, B did her thing, and legendary fashion photographer Thierry Le Goues went to work.

We caught up with Ebon Heath recently to discuss the past, present and future of his work, and to hear about his Complex cover-making experience. Check the interivew...


Complex: What brought you to where you are today as an artist?

Ebon Heath: In a past life, I founded a studio called ((( stereotype ))) that did a lot of design work within New York Hip Hop culture—specifically, music packaging, magazines, and fashion—in the 1990s. After that I moved on to found Cell Out, which was using design to save the world by creating media for ngo's, non profits, and social minded brands. I also taught design at Lehman College in the Bronx. Now i find myself in Berlin making my art, trying to stay free and make bigger dreams come true daily.


What other things have informed your current work?

When I was young I saw Caulder's Circus and that always stuck in my mind—the idea of making objects come alive. Growing up with parents who loved Jazz really taught me how to listen, and then later the poetry of Hip Hop made me see the words dance. I also have been inspired by the rich Carnival culture of Trinidad, and by one of my mentors [Carnival artist] Peter Minshall. Remix it all visually together and it sounds like me.


At first glance, it isn't easy to see that the words are actually a physical object. Why make type into a physical thing at a time when almost everything else is going digital?

The main goal of my work with type is to liberate our words from the page or screen so they can come alive and express the content they uniquely hold. I have always been inspired by the organic nature of Graffitti and its ability to give type a unique form dependent on its surrounding letters, expressive intent, and usually the amount of time writers have to create.

As much as I love digital, I don't think it can replace our hands, real light and shadow, our ability to walk around something and see it from a different angle. No matter how good the illusion or the synthetic version is, you cant beat the real thing. We have lost our sense of craft and the process of making things. Today, we can do it all by clicking a button instead of getting our hands dirty, practicing, and focusing all our energy on the details—like cutting out thousands of letters).

Working so much in the digital world made me miss the joyful mistakes and experiments that happen when you can touch something, or see something without it being plugged in. I was part of the last generation who were taught the analog while the digital grew up from floppy discs to terabytes. Technology is integrated in my working process, especially working with lasers now, yet my output is analog.


How were these pieces made?

Generally, I work with papers and plastics in my sculptures. For my jewelry, I use metals, plastics and leather. I originally was hand cutting my letters but now I use lasers which give me more freedom to work with different kinds of materials.

The majority of time working on these sculptures is spent on assembling all the elements. Tying hundreds of knots in nylon fishing string to make letters float invisibly or twirl like tornadoes. Designing these structures tends to be more of a engineering problem then fine art since my factors for a successful piece are balancing weight evenly, structural support and discovering the best use of materials for construction.

This specific project was quite surreal since I was in Bali working on my jewelry collection and came back to NYC just to build these 2 structures. I had a great crew of set designers (Amir and Jamie) that helped make all the production details come together, created a rolling design studio in the back of a rent-a-truck, and with little sleep we all made it come to life.

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Your cover art adds a new dimension to the classic celebrity magazine cover—what are your thoughts about designing covers in an age when print magazines are struggling to stay relevant?

I love print, but magazines are now websites and covers are now thumbnails. As a kid, 12-inch record sleeves were like giant worlds I would stare at for hours—now its probably 12 pixels. Yet, to impact media, you still need images, and hopefully art, that will entice the viewer to come and take a look. We eat with our eyes more then ever before—a pop up ad, a billboard, bus stand, everything is filled with images and headlines, not just the newsstand anymore.

Print may die because we run out of trees to make paper, but the addiction we have to visual candy is only growing. Hopefully, however, if you add more quality to the printed word covers turn into posters and magazines will become collectible—more so than bookmarks online will ever be.


You worked with Thierry Le Goues and Beyoncé on this project—both big names in their respective industries—what was that like?

Thierry is a master of his craft and it was great to see his working process. You can tell he really enjoys what he does, and he gave my work so much attention and love. It's always beautiful to see your work through someone else's well crafted eyes—he painted with light on my letters.

Beyoncé is a piece of art and design on many levels. It's a fantasy come true to see her swimming in my words. Thanks to Brent Rollins and Complex for making it all happen.


What's it like for you to collaborate, or have your work interact with music, fashion or other art forms?

I think the idea of visually remixing all these different mediums is a common thread in all the different types of art and design I make. What does music look like? What do our words look like when they dance? How do we listen with our eyes?

My performance work explores this idea specifically by storytelling with sound, vocals, movement, fashion, engineering, light and a whole lotta words all dancing together. I think the idea of creating a live experience you can't download that can make you feel something in this moment where we have seen it all before is very exciting. What does it look like when the words of Talib Kweli or Iranian poet Forough Farrokhzad come alive and dance? My performance piece at the MADE Space in Berlin last year tried to illustrate a possible answer to that questions with a ballet of typography.


What other projects are you working on now and in the near future?

I am currently finalizing a new jewelry collection, working with a german porcelain company, designing a chandelier, exhibiting sculptures and installations and developing the next performance piece. I get bored easy so there is not much time to sleep—and words have so much to say.

Ebon Heath's website: listeningwithmyeyes.com
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Message par QueenxBee le 19/07/11, 05:00 pm

:heart: très Jolie ce photoshoot :heart:
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Message par MrsRuliette le 19/07/11, 06:21 pm

Je sais que le lien a déjà été posté mais quelqu'un pourrait me donner, à nouveau, le lien pour commander les magazines à l'étranger, s'il vous plait :lol:
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Message par NinooMessi le 19/07/11, 06:46 pm

J'A.D.O.R.E WOW
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Message par Neminou le 19/07/11, 07:15 pm

J'ADOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOORE
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Message par Julien-DC le 19/07/11, 07:24 pm

Wooow magnifique comme dhabitude :D Legend Keyonce ta signature fait mal aux yeux..... LOL
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Message par Xavier Ink. le 19/07/11, 07:49 pm

SUBLIME !!!!
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Message par Lambert le 19/07/11, 08:01 pm

Magniiiifique ! J'adoooore ! C'est très recherché, j'adore !
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Message par MrsCrazyB le 19/07/11, 09:21 pm

j'adore ce shoot!! surtout les photos en noir et blanc
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Message par Edoli. le 19/07/11, 09:26 pm

PARFAITE !
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Message par Youss le 04/08/11, 11:00 am

COMPLEX [2011] Beyonce-Complex-12
:boum*:
L'interview est très catch et personnel J'A-DORE ! WOW

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